Séminaires RALI-OLST

Summarizing Speech

Gerald Penn (gpenn <at> cs (point) toronto (point) edu])

University of Toronto

Wednesday 25 November 2009 at 11:30 AM

Salle 3195, Pavillon André-Aisenstadt


Speech is arguably the most basic, most natural form of communication that we engage in, so it should come as no surprise that there has been a consistent pressure to deliver spoken audio content on web pages that, in principle, can be searched through. Even once the search problem is solved, however, the low-bandwidth, non-visual, traditional delivery of spoken audio makes it much more difficult to _browse_ through. This makes the automated summarization of speech particularly attractive: given a number N, prepare a summary of a spoken "document" that contains the most important or salient content that is N seconds long, or N utterances long, or N percent of the original document's length. This talk will present a (human-prepared) summary of recent research on summarizing speech. We'll talk about how speech summarization is usually evaluated, including some of the appropriate baselines in this area, the dependence of genre on the performance and tuning of summarizers, the role of automated speech transcription in summarization, and the usefulness of some of the acoustic, untranscribed features of the speech signal.


To receive weekly talk announcements, please send an e-mail to majordomo@iro.umontreal.ca. Simply write a message containing the single line 'subscribe ralli' (without the quotes).

See all the weekly talks for the year:

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019